New Edition: Wildlife and the Law

The author with poisoned satellite-tagged golden eagle 'Alma' recovered from MIllden Estate, Glenesk, Angus in July 2009

The author with poisoned satellite-tagged golden eagle 'Alma' recovered from MIllden Estate, Glenesk, Angus in July 2009

Wildlife and the Law has now been updated to take account of new wildlife legislation enacted since the first edition of the book published n 2012.

The book is designed in part to help prevent wildlife offences being committed, though where prevention has failed the well-indexed contents should help the reader recognise the offence and respond appropriately. It spells out chapter and verse in an easy-to-follow text and numerous colour photographs. As well as wildlife law, the book includes separate chapters on cruelty to domestic and captive animals, a brief chapter on offences relating to dogs, and one on offences committed against Sites of Special Scientific Interest.

The new edition contains additional material relating to the following and much more:

  • The role of the National Wildlife Crime Unit

  • The many changes in general licences

  • Suspicious disappearance of satellite-tagged birds

  • The Werritty review

  • Inclusion of the beaver on the Habitats Regulations

  • The updates COTES regulations

  • The Ivory Act 2018

  • Updated tail docking legislation

  • Improved forensic capability

Wildlife & the Law will be an asset to a range of people:

  • Police officers, and the staff of other organisations who have some responsibility in the investigation of wildlife crime;

  • Countryside rangers, foresters, badger groups, bat groups and others with a professional interest in wildlife issues;

  • Landowners, gamekeepers, farmers and pest controllers, who might use traps and snares or control ‘pest’ species in the course of their work;

  • Hill walkers, and others who take advantage of the countryside for recreation;

  • Property owners, developers or even householders who might have concerns with nesting birds, bat roosts or badger setts.

Sam Bradley